LaVar Ball Claims He Was A Better Tight End Than Rob Gronkowski, Ball’s Old Teammates Weigh In

by 3 months ago

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The evolution of LaVar Ball has been fascinating: first baseless, then fraudulent, then insufferable, now downright endearing. He’s like watching a movie that’s so bad it’s enjoyable. LaVar Ball is the human reincarnation of Sharknado. And he’s finna make more sequels than Lethal Weapon.

Ball’s latest egregious claim came in the form of telling Rizz and Hammer on ESPN Cleveland that Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski “can’t hang with me back in my heyday, too fast, too strong!”

Now, unlike LaVar’s ‘better than Jordan’ claim, this one has a bit more clout. Ball had stints on the New York Jets practice squad as a defensive end in 1994, reports Bleacher Report, but was loaned out to the London Monarchs of the World League of American Football as a backup tight end behind Michael Titley.

Titley had this to say about his former teammate:

Ball ‘at the time could run like a deer’ despite being a ‘real big guy,’ Titley said. ‘If he’d had a couple opportunities and some more time, I think he could have made something of himself football-wise.’

Former Monarchs cornerback Kenny McEntyre was a bit…harsher.

Man, he’s talking all that junk—and he was garbage,” he told Weiner. “Personally, I think the most athletic people in the world are basketball players, and he actually wasn’t a bad athlete, to be honest with you. But he was no comparison to what his kids are—let’s just put it like that.”

Former Jet Marvin Williams painted Ball in a positive light.

“I remember Ball very well,” he told Rich Cimini of ESPN.com. “He was a very athletic guy and raw. I remember him very well because he played only one year of college football. I remember a very confident guy and, yes, he voiced his opinion and was cocky, but overall seemed like a great guy.”

LaVar’s only documented stats in the league: returning two kicks for 28 yards…

via GIPHY

[h/t Bleacher Report]


TAGSLavar BallRob Gronkowski

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