A Suspect In Tupac’s Murder Has Finally Revealed What Really Happened On The Night Of His Death

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A few weeks ago, we were treated to one of the more vicious rap beefs in recent memory when Pusha T scorched the earth with a particularly savage diss track aimed at Drake that almost definitely made the Canadian lock himself in a dark room and let tears run slowly down his face. Thankfully, Pusha only murdered Drake in a metaphorical sense as opposed to what rival crews used to do to each other in the Golden Age of rap feuds back in the 1990s.

In the span of two years, Tupac Shakur and The Notorious B.I.G.— two of the biggest names (and the biggest rivals) in hip-hop at the time— were gunned down in incidents stemming from various intercoastal conflicts. There has been plenty of speculation about who was behind the murders but no one has ever admitted to having a role in either of the killings— at least until now.

After attending a boxing match in Vegas on September 6, 1996, 2Pac and his entourage beat up rival gang member Orlando Anderson in a casino before eventually making their way to the Las Vegas Strip, where the rapper was gunned down after the car he and Suge Knight were riding in was riddled with bullets. Plenty of accusations have been leveled over the past couple of decades but it looks like we finally know who was behind the killing now that one of the men in the Cadillac that rolled up on the unsuspecting victims has opted to come clean.

According to The Sun, Duane “Keefe D” Davis— Anderson’s uncle— decided it was time to tell the world what really happened on that fateful night after he was diagnosed with terminal cancer. According to Davis, he hopped into the passenger seat of a car driven by Terrence “T-Brown” Brown with his nephew in the backseat next to DeAndre “Dre” Smith.

Anderson— who was shot and killed in 1998— was one of the prime suspects in Tupac’s murder, and while Davis neglected to identify the shooter, he said that the shots were fired by one of the men in the backseat. We might never know the true identity of the triggerman but I don’t think you’ll have too much trouble coming to your own conclusion.