Jennifer Lawrence Finally Comments On Leaked Nudes, Calls ‘The Fappening’ A Sex Crime

j-law

Vanity Fair


Jennifer Lawrence is on the cover of the November issue of Vanity Fair, promoting The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1, a movie destine to make Scrooge McDuck piles of cash. In her profile with V.F. contributing editor Sam Kashner, JLaw breaks her silence about her leaked nudes for the first time since the news broke on August 31st. Via Vanity Fair:

The 24-year-old actress had not previously commented on the incident, but she spoke to Kashner at length about the anger she felt. “Just because I’m a public figure, just because I’m an actress, does not mean that I asked for this,” she says. “It does not mean that it comes with the territory. It’s my body, and it should be my choice, and the fact that it is not my choice is absolutely disgusting. I can’t believe that we even live in that kind of world.”

She had been tempted to write a statement when news of the privacy violation broke, she says, but “every single thing that I tried to write made me cry or get angry. I started to write an apology, but I don’t have anything to say I’m sorry for. I was in a loving, healthy, great relationship for four years. It was long distance, and either your boyfriend is going to look at porn or he’s going to look at you.”

Lawrence also addresses the legal ramifications of the hack. “It is not a scandal. It is a sex crime,” she tells Kashner. “It is a sexual violation. It’s disgusting. The law needs to be changed, and we need to change. That’s why these Web sites are responsible. Just the fact that somebody can be sexually exploited and violated, and the first thought that crosses somebody’s mind is to make a profit from it. It’s so beyond me. I just can’t imagine being that detached from humanity. I can’t imagine being that thoughtless and careless and so empty inside.”

I still sympathize with Lawrence, which I laid out over Labor Day weekend when the story broke. I stand by that. “The Fappening” was a result of a criminal act and a gross violation of personal privacy. No one “deserves” to have their private pics stolen off their phone by sleazy hackers. Even if it was a iCloud security flaw, the onus of blame certainly doesn’t fall on Lawrence. I hope Lawrence and the other celebrities involved get the justice they deserve.

Here is the full cover. Read more over at Vanity Fair. 

jlaw

Vanity Fair