Dietician: Order TWO Burgers Instead Of One Hamburger With A Side Of Fries Because It’s Healthier

by 2 weeks ago
Burger Fries

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We live in a society where getting two burgers is seen as a bad thing because people will tell you that it’s unhealthy to consume two magnificently meaty beef patties paired with carbohydratey buns that soak up all that juicy goodness because of heart disease or something. But now science is here to break that stigma to smithereens and empower people everywhere to indulge in an extra hamburger. However, there is a catch, because there’s always a catch. Scientists say that you can savor your second burger if and only if you bypass the French fries. What a conundrum.

This delicious idea was brought to the hungry masses by registered dietitian and nutritionist Emily Field. Her groundbreaking philosophy suggests that people bypass labeling food as “good” and “bad,” but suggests looking at what the food they are eating is comprised of. “To do this, she encourages people to think about three components of a food – fat, carbohydrates, and proteins,” Business Insider writes. “Protein fuels your muscles and keeps you feeling full, carbohydrates provide energy, and fat helps us absorb vitamins and minerals while keeping cells healthy.” Field suggests that you ask yourself, “How am I going to feel two hours after I eat that?”

The thought process behind ditching the fries and doubling down on the burgers is that you’re majorly upping your protein intake, plus you can reduce your overall calorie intake for the rest of the day because you’ll feel full and satisfied by reducing the number of carbs you’re consuming. A hamburger from McDonald’s has 250 calories and 13 grams of protein compared to 337 calories and only 3.3 grams of protein from a medium-sized fries. The burger has 31 grams of carbs compared to 42 grams with the French fries. Carbohydrates get broken down by the body and turned mostly into glucose, which directly influences blood sugar levels. Giving you a spurt of energy initially and then feeling sluggish later. It should be noted that this applies to a rather small McDonald’s hamburger and not a whopping 3/4-pound burger with bacon, cheese, chili, and fried onions.


TAGSBurgersFoodHamburgersHealthScience

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