Lamar Odom’s Fiancée Calls Off Engagement After Claiming Lamar Has Some ‘Things’ To Work Through

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If I were a “self-starter,” I could have drafted this post a full year ago and waited for this day to inevitably come.

Last November, Lamar Odom proposed to personal trainer Sabrina Parr at Prime 112 restaurant in Miami after just four months of dating. Odom’s 18-year-old son immediately took to social media to blast his father for not only failing to keep his own blood relatives informed of the decision, but for choosing a woman with a low approval rating amongst them.

After throwing an engagement party this past September, Parr has announced that the engagement is off via her Instagram stories Wednesday.

“Y’all know I’m honest and transparent so I have to be the first to let you guys know that I am no longer engaged to Lamar,” she wrote. “This has been a difficult decision for me to make but it is the best for myself and my children.”

“Lamar has some things that he alone has to work through. I love him dearly but I am no longer able to be by his side while he seeks the help he so desperately needs,” her posting said. I wish him all the best and I am asking that you pray for everyone involved.”

While Sabrina didn’t specify what “things” Lamar has to work through, his struggles with substance abuse and porn addiction may be smart wagers for a betting man.

In September of 2019, Lamar revealed that his porn addiction was causing a rift between he and Sabrina. Sabrina attempted to break Lamar’s habit by downloading an app that blocks all porn video and pictures from his phone.

“I don’t think you can die from watching porn, even though you kill relationships [with] people that you really love,” Lamar said before claiming ridding himself of porn was harder than giving up drugs.

If it is in fact addiction, and it’s between porn and drugs, I’d prefer it be the one that doesn’t put Lamar in a coma for three days after 12 strokes and two heart attacks. Just preference.

 

Matt Keohan Avatar
Matt’s love of writing was born during a sixth grade assembly when it was announced that his essay titled “Why Drugs Are Bad” had taken first prize in D.A.R.E.’s grade-wide contest. The anti-drug people gave him a $50 savings bond for his brave contribution to crime-fighting, and upon the bond’s maturity 10 years later, he used it to buy his very first bag of marijuana.