A MASSIVE Great White Shark Is Swimming Past The Best Beach Towns On The East Coast, Including Ocean City And The Jersey Shore

by 4 years ago

Do you like the beach? I like the beach. I dream of weekends at Dewey Beach, slurping on blooody marys at 10AM on the Starboard deck before chillin’ in the sand and going for swim. I love the beach.

But here’s something to think about before you jump in the water this summer: A MASSIVE 3,456-pound female great white shark is currently swimming up and down the East Coast, a mere 10 miles off shore. Her name is Mary Lee and sometimes she’s pinged right close to the beach itself.

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsFor the last month, Mary Lee has been tracked while swimming past some of the most popular beach downs on the East coast, including Ocean City, Bethany Beach, Dewey Beach, Rehobeth, Cape May, Avalon, Atlantic City, and Long Beach Island. It’s most recent “ping” was pretty close to LBI:

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Press of Atlantic City Screenshot


No worries though, Mid-Atlantic Bros. It’s most likely going up to Cape Cod to chill for the summer in the cool water. The Press of Atlantic City explains:

The shark’s latest pings continue to indicated a northerly course up the Jersey shore, often less than 10 miles from the coast.   The most recent ping occurred at 7:43am Friday, placing Mary Less less than five miles off the southeast tip of Long Beach Island.

Mary Lee, a 3,456-pound female great white shark, has traveled almost 20,000 miles since she was tagged off Cape Cod, Massachusetts, in September 2012. OCEARCH, a nonprofit group that researches great whites, placed a tracker on Mary Lee that will emit a ping each time the shark’s dorsal fin surfaces above the ocean. Over the last month, Mary Lee has made steady progress northward up the East Coast of the United States. In early April, the 16-foot long shark was off North and South Carolina. Earlier this week, she was lurking just off Assateague Island, off the Delmarva Peninsula.

In the last 24 hours, Mary Lee moved north, paralleling the Delaware coastline about 10 miles offshore. Then came five pings early Thursday morning, as Mary Lee zigzagged about 10 to 15 miles east of Cape May and Wildwood. Just after noon on Thursday, the latest ping placed the shark about 15 miles due east of Avalon Sharks are so Bro.

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Sharks are so Bro.


TAGSbeachesFishingMarine Biologyocean citySharks