ESPN’s Max Kellerman Reduces Tom Brady To A ‘Game Manager’ Who Is ‘Not The Same Guy’ In Crazy Rant

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Max Kellerman is bound to be correct one of these years. Whether it’s his 10,000th ‘Tom Brady is washed’ take or his 100,000th take, the ESPN talking head will dub himself clairvoyant when that day comes.

The only thing more shameful than Kellerman claiming Tom Brady “is going to fall off a cliff and be a bum in short order” before a Super Bowl-winning 2016 season is the ESPN host questioning whether Larry Fitzgerald, who recently moved into second on the all-time receptions list, would be a Hall of Famer.

Kellerman is back on his bullshit after Brady threw for just 150 yards in the Patriots win against the Bills Sunday, with the offense managing just nine points.

On ESPN’s First Take, Kellerman chalked Brady up to a “game manager” and said the Patriots should be concerned with his productivity. Mind you, in the first three games, Brady put up these numbers:

W, Steelers: 341 yards and 3 TDs
W, Dolphins: 264 yards and 2 TDs
W, Jets: 306 yards and 2 TDs

Put on your stupid hats, folks!

“I am concerned about Tom Brady. The fact of the matter is he was not his usual self last season and he’s 150,000 years old.

Then, he doesn’t practice during the week. He says, ‘Hey, I’m not a spring chicken anymore,’ goes out gets beaten up by the Bills defense, they were kind of lucky to win the game.

And if you notice what’s happening to him now, he came in game manager, great defense, with Belichick. Turns into ‘Tom Brady can carry the offense, you don’t have to worry about the defense.’ We’re back to the defense has to carry Tom Brady. And he’s a game manager. It’s not the same guy.”

Max Kellerman is Tom Brady’s greatest superpower.

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Matt’s love of writing was born during a sixth grade assembly when it was announced that his essay titled “Why Drugs Are Bad” had taken first prize in D.A.R.E.’s grade-wide contest. The anti-drug people gave him a $50 savings bond for his brave contribution to crime-fighting, and upon the bond’s maturity 10 years later, he used it to buy his very first bag of marijuana.