The Greatest Photos Of The 2017 Solar Eclipse – See What It Looked Like From Space

by 1 year ago

If you’re reading this that means that you didn’t singe your retinas from staring at the solar eclipse. Congratulations. However, you may have missed what the 2017 solar eclipse truly looked like if you were using the special glasses that had lenses blacked out more than a 114-pound girl after doing shots of Elijah Craig Bourbon on her 21st birthday. Don’t fret. We got you. We gathered the greatest photos of the 2017 solar eclipse for your viewing pleasure and they totally won’t blind you for all eternity.

NASA, which has calculated the time, location and duration of every eclipse up until the year 3000, was busy on Monday and shared some really outstanding photos of the celestial event.



nasa solar eclipse photos

Via NASA

This composite image of eleven pictures shows the progression of a total solar eclipse at Madras High School in Madras, Oregon on Monday, August 21, 2017. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)


nasa solar eclipse photos

Via NASA

The last glimmer of the sun is seen as the moon makes its final move over the sun during the total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)


nasa solar eclipse photos

Via NASA

A total solar eclipse is seen on Monday, August 21, 2017 from onboard a NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s Gulfstream III 25,000 feet above the Oregon coast. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Thomas)


nasa solar eclipse photos

Via NASA

The Sun’s corona, only visible during the total eclipse, is shown as a crown of white flares from the surface during a total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017 from onboard a NASA Gulfstream III aircraft flying 25,000 feet above the Oregon coast. The red spots called Bailey's beads occurs where the moon grazes by the Sun and the rugged lunar limb topography allows beads of sunlight to shine through in some areas. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Thomas)


You can see the silhouette of the International Space Station in the light of a solar eclipse.

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The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls) (NHQ201708210305) @nasa #eclipse2017 #solareclipse2017 #sun #moon #billingalls #internationalspacestation @roscosmosofficial

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Speaking of the Space Station, here’s what it looked like from the ISS.

The partial solar eclipse from space taken by the European Space Agency’s Proba-2 satellite.

More photos from the ESA.

Check out the partial solar eclipse over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington.

The eclipse as seen at the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in Charleston, South Carolina.

This photo taken at Smith Rock State Park in Oregon is outstanding.

You can check out how the solar eclipse looked like from NOAA Satellites as it brought large swathes of the United States into darkness.


TAGSISSNASAsolar eclipseSpace

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