People Are PISSED Over This ‘Insensitive’ Hair Product Ad And For The Life Of Me I Can’t Figure Out Why

KKK. White Nationalist. Hulk Hogan. Shea Moisture. In no particular order. Now listen, I know I’m a white, straight, healthy male who was born to a middle-class family whose parents are still together. Everything in this world is constructed to help me succeed and every problem I have is petty.  I am not oppressed, racially profiled, sexually harassed (unfortunately), thus I can never truly understand the struggles of some others.

People are pissed about this Shea Moisture ad because it likens a black girl being bullied for her natural hair to two white girls disliking their hair because of lack of volume. So essentially, white people can’t hate bad hair days because of others have it worse? I don’t know.

Anyone insulted by this ad can remove the cactus from their anuses and delete my number. And the irony is that the people deleting my number probably won’t be my black friends, they’ll be the white entitled people with turtle-shelled glasses who convince themselves they’re being socially proactive by projecting appropriation on hair product companies. Fucking hair product companies. Why? Because it’s easier to bark on Twitter than to actually do something constructive about it. I understand the intent and agree with the notion that everyone should be mindful and compassionate to the collective struggles of others, but this kind of pettifogging distorts and weakens the message. Go to bed, people. You’ll forget about it tomorrow.

Shea Moisture, which is a company with deep-ties to the black community and whose primary focus is women of color, was bullied into issuing a statement of apology.

Wow, okay – so guys, listen, we really f-ed this one up. Please know that our intention was not – and would never be – to disrespect our community, and as such, we are pulling this piece immediately because it does not represent what we intended to communicate.

Twitter still felt the need to rub Shea’s nose in it.

Someone speaks the truth.

[h/t Uproxx]

Matt Keohan Avatar
Matt’s love of writing was born during a sixth grade assembly when it was announced that his essay titled “Why Drugs Are Bad” had taken first prize in D.A.R.E.’s grade-wide contest. The anti-drug people gave him a $50 savings bond for his brave contribution to crime-fighting, and upon the bond’s maturity 10 years later, he used it to buy his very first bag of marijuana.