The NBA Announces Big Changes To The All-Star Game (Including Kobe Tribute), And Fans Are All Sorts Of Confused

ABC


Something needs to change about the NBA All-Star game. I went to the 2017 All Star game in New Orleans and every player made James Harden look like Gary Payton defensively. The final score was a billion to a billion and 20. Zero energy in the stadium. It was trash. Trash, trash, trash.

Maybe it’s unfixable because the outcome is ultimately meaningless and players care more about being on the team than actually playing in the game, but a change-up of any kind is welcome by me.

We’re two week away from Team LeBron taking on Team Giannis in the 2020 All Star Game in Chicago and the NBA has announced a new format it will roll out to “increase competition” and clean up the trash of yesteryear.

Via For the Win:

  • At the end of the first quarter, the leading team will win $100,000 for a chosen charity.
  • The game score will then be reset for the second quarter (though each team’s running total score will come into play later on). Just like in the first quarter, whichever team “wins” the second quarter will win $100,00 for charity. The same process will occur in the third quarter.
  • In the fourth quarter, each team’s running total score will return, and a game-winning target score will be calculated by adding 24 points – in tribute to Bryant – to the leading team’s score. If Team LeBron is leading Team Giannis by a score of 130-125 after three quarters, the winning team would be the first team to reach 154 points. Whichever team wins the game will win an additional $200,000 for its chosen charity.

Incorporating a Kobe tribute into game action is fire, but I’m not sure NBA fans have the mental capacity to keep up with the new advanced string theory format.

Remind me to take an adderall before the game.

Matt Keohan Avatar
Matt’s love of writing was born during a sixth grade assembly when it was announced that his essay titled “Why Drugs Are Bad” had taken first prize in D.A.R.E.’s grade-wide contest. The anti-drug people gave him a $50 savings bond for his brave contribution to crime-fighting, and upon the bond’s maturity 10 years later, he used it to buy his very first bag of marijuana.