The NCAA Issued A Predictably Weakass Response After LeBron James Tore Into Them Over The ‘Rich Paul Rule’

ncaa responds lebron rich paul rule

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Earlier this week, the NCAA announced it would be instituting a new rule that would require prospective NBA agents to meet certain conditions if they want to represent student-athletes who are exploring the option of going pro—the most notable of which is the possession of a bachelor’s degree.

It was unclear exactly what the motivation behind the new regulations was but people were quick to dub it the “Rich Paul Rule,” a reference to LeBron James’ agent, who’s done a pretty damn good job representing the superstar despite having never graduated from college.

It didn’t take long for the rule to come to LeBron’s attention and he quickly issued a response in the form of a couple of tweets where he made it very clear how he felt about it.

It appears the NCAA took notice of James taking notice, and on Wednesday, it decided to issue a response to the criticism its been on the receiving end over the past few days.

In the statement, the NCAA admitted you can achieve success without having a college degree but is apparently not willing to allow people who want to be agents to attempt to do that because logic and reasoning has never been the organization’s strong suit.

I’d say I expected better from the NCAA, but given their long history of paving an endless road to hell with good intentions, I guess I should have seen this coming.

[Total Pro Sports]

Connor O'Toole avatar
Connor Toole is a Senior Editor at BroBible based in Brooklyn, NY who embodies more of the stereotypes associated with the borough than he's comfortable with. Frequently described as "freakishly tall," he once used his 6'10" frame to sneak in the NBA Draft before walking around the streets of NYC masquerading as the newest member of the Utah Jazz. Unfortunately, that wasn't enough to land him a contract, so he was forced to settle for writing on the internet for a living instead. If you're mad about something he wrote, be sure that any angry tweets you send note the similarity between his last name and a popular insult, as no one has ever done that before.